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Infectious Diseases Johns Hopkins Medicine

Your Health is a FREE e-newsletter that serves as your smart, simple connection to the world-class expertise of Johns Hopkins. You are now signed up. Please try again. Email Address First Name Last Name. By submitting your information, you agree to Johns Hopkins Medicine's privacy policy. We will not use your information for any purposes other

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Stay On Top of Your Heart Health Johns Hopkins Medicine

Heart Health Checklist: Call 911 or go to the ER: If you have heart problems such as chest pains, shortness of breath or sudden numbness, get help immediately. Stay on schedule: If you have a heart procedure or surgery scheduled, don't postpone it. Your condition could get worse. Continue your care: If you have already been diagnosed with heart

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Tips for Keeping a Healthy Prostate Johns Hopkins …

Tips for Keeping a Healthy Prostate. Mens Health. 1. Maintain a Balanced Diet. They’re probably not your favorite part of any meal, but green, leafy vegetables are a good first step toward a healthy prostate. These vegetables are full of important vitamins and antioxidants that keep you — and specifically, your prostate — healthy.

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Benefits of Telemedicine Johns Hopkins Medicine

Benefits of Telemedicine. Telemedicine, which enables video or phone appointments between a patient and their health care practitioner, benefits both health and convenience. More health care providers are offering to “see” patients by computer and smartphone. “Health organizations are providing virtual appointments and are expanding their

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Forgiveness: Your Health Depends on It Johns Hopkins

And research points to an increase in the forgiveness-health connection as you age. “There is an enormous physical burden to being hurt and disappointed,” says Karen Swartz, M.D., director of the Mood Disorders Adult Consultation Clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital.

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Healthy Eating During Adolescence Johns Hopkins …

Always talk with your adolescent's health care provider regarding his or her healthy diet and exercise requirements. 7 School Lunch Tips for Picky Eaters. Getting your child to eat healthfully is a struggle for many parents, especially if you have a picky eater in your family. Picky eaters often bring back unopened lunch boxes or ignore the

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Ear Infection (Otitis Media) Symptoms & Treatment …

The otoscope is a lighted instrument that allows the health care provider to see inside the ear. A pneumatic otoscope blows a puff of air into the ear to test eardrum movement. Tympanometry is a test that can be performed in most health care providers' offices to …

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DEMOGRAPHIC AND PERSONAL INFORMATION

National Institutes of Health - NCRR $476,000 PI: McCaffery JM, Department of Biology, JHU Role: Major-user 7/01/07 – 6/31/09 Oxygen sensing and adaptation to host tissue hypoxia in C. neoformans R21 AI072186 National Institutes of Health – NIAID $275,000 Role: PI

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Your Health Johns Hopkins Medicine

Your Health. One of the best things you can do to protect and improve your health is to stay informed. Your Health is a FREE e-newsletter that serves as your smart, simple connection to the world-class expertise of Johns Hopkins.

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Women's Health Johns Hopkins Medicine

Find a Doctor. Specializing In. Alopecia. Women's Health. Amenorrhea. Abnormal Pap Smear. Gynecology and Obstetrics. Breast Biopsy. Breast Cancer and Pregnancy.

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Dysthymia Johns Hopkins Medicine

Mental health professionals think it’s a result of chemical imbalances in the brain. Many factors are thought to contribute to depression. These include environmental, psychological, biological, and genetic factors. Chronic stress and trauma have also been linked to this condition.

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The Power of Positive Thinking Johns Hopkins Medicine

The mechanism for the connection between health and positivity remains murky, but researchers suspect that people who are more positive may be better protected against the inflammatory damage of stress. Another possibility is that hope and positivity help people make better health and life decisions and focus more on long-term goals.

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Common Childhood Illnesses Johns Hopkins Medicine

Children are more susceptible to sickness due to their underdeveloped immune systems and their high exposure to germs at schools and child care facilities. Most children may have 6 to 8 colds a year. Other common childhood illnesses include allergies, skin problems, eye conditions, neurological issues and gastrointestinal conditions.

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Baldness (Alopecia) Johns Hopkins Medicine

Baldness is hair loss, or absence of hair. It’s also called alopecia. Baldness is usually most noticeable on the scalp, but can happen anywhere on the body where hair grows. The condition is more common in men than in women. Depending on the type, the symptoms of baldness will vary. There are

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Medical Records: Getting Organized Johns Hopkins Medicine

Family health history: Information about your health and the health of your close relatives. Some diseases are genetic, so having one or more family members with certain diseases may raise your risk of one day developing those diseases, too. A family health history helps your health-care provider determine if you have a higher risk of

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Menorrhagia Johns Hopkins Medicine

Menorrhagia is heavy or prolonged menstrual bleeding. It is a common problem in women. It is caused by hormone problems, problems with the uterus, or other health conditions. Menorrhagia is diagnosed with a pelvic exam, ultrasound, pap test, and sometimes a biopsy. Treatment includes hormones, or other medicine, or procedures to treat the

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Neurological Disorders Johns Hopkins Medicine

Request an Appointment. Find a Doctor. 410-955-5000 Maryland. 855-695-4872 Outside of Maryland. +1-410-502-7683 International. Find a Doctor. See Less. Find a …

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Oversleeping: Bad for Your Health

Oversleeping is associated with many health problems, including: Type 2 diabetes. Heart disease. Obesity. Depression. Headaches. Greater risk of dying from a medical condition. Does that mean sleeping too much will make you sick? Not necessarily, says Vsevolod Polotsky, M.D., Ph.D., a professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins Medicine.

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Lesbian and Bisexual Women's Health Issues Johns Hopkins

Sexual Health. Because of heteronormativity — the notion that heterosexuality is the norm — some health care providers may assume lesbian and bisexual women are heterosexual when discussing their sexual health. It may also be assumed that a woman in a current same-sex relationship has never or will never have sex with a man.

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Breast Health: 3-Step Plan for Preventive Care Johns

Health experts have different advice for mammograms: The USPSTF recommends screening every 2 years for women ages 50 to 74. The ACS recommends yearly screening for all women ages 45 to 54. Women ages 55 and older should change to mammograms every 2 years. Or they may choose to still have a yearly screening.

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Routine Screenings Johns Hopkins Medicine

Routine screenings also allow physicians to compare test results over time, increasing the chances that a potential problem can be prevented by interventions like medications or lifestyle changes. For most adults, depending on age, doctors will recommend a screening schedule that includes regular physical exams, body mass index (BMI), skin

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Herbal Medicine Johns Hopkins Medicine

Products made from botanicals, or plants, that are used to treat diseases or to maintain health are called herbal products, botanical products, or phytomedicines. A product made from plants and used solely for internal use is called an herbal supplement. Many prescription drugs and over-the-counter

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Chinese Medicine Johns Hopkins Medicine

Balance between health and disease is a key concept. TCM treatment seeks to restore this balance through treatment specific to the individual. It is believed that to regain balance, you must achieve the balance between the internal body organs and the external elements of …

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5 Health Problems You’re Actually Not Too Young For

5 Health Problems You’re Actually Not Too Young For. Fitness and Performance Heart and Vascular Diabetes High Blood Pressure/Hypertension. Reviewed By: Nilofer Saba Azad, M.D. Reviewed By: Erin Donnelly Michos, M.D., M.H.S. If you’re a woman in your 20s, you probably think you don’t have to worry about health problems such as strokes and

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Mood Disorders Johns Hopkins Medicine

A mood disorder is a mental health class that health professionals use to broadly describe all types of depression and bipolar disorders. Children, teens, and adults can have mood disorders. However, children and teens don’t always have the same symptoms as adults. It’s harder to diagnose mood

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Eating for Your Gut Johns Hopkins Medicine

Digestive system problems are common and cause symptoms such as gas, heartburn, bloating and constipation. A variety of factors may impact digestive system health, including age and other health conditions. Eating for your gut is one important way to promote digestive health and prevent symptoms.

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Interview: The Impact of Racism on Children’s Health

Maria Trent, director of the Division of Adolescent/Young Adult Medicine at Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, sat on the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Section on Adolescent Health for over a decade and was the lead author of the AAP’s 2019 policy statement on racism’s impact on children’s health. Monique Jindal, as a chief resident at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital, created a

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LGBTQ Health Johns Hopkins Medicine

Find a Doctor. Specializing In. Gender Affirmation Surgery. Transgender Health. At Another Johns Hopkins Member Hospital: Howard County General Hospital. …

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Anorexia Nervosa Johns Hopkins Medicine

Anorexia nervosa (or simply anorexia) is an eating disorder that causes people to obsess about their weight and food. People who suffer with this behavior problem have a distorted body image and see themselves as overweight even when their weight is dangerously low.

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Injectable Corticosteroids Johns Hopkins Medicine

Your health care provider will usually limit your total number of corticosteroid injections to 3 to 4 a year. If you are considering taking corticosteroids to treat a muscular or skeletal condition, be sure to talk with your health care provider about all the benefits and risks.

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5 “Little” Health Issues That May Be Bigger Than You Think

5 “Little” Health Issues That May Be Bigger Than You Think. Mood Disorders Women's Health Age-Related Depression, Mood and Stress Diagnosis and Screening for Gynecologic Conditions. Maybe you “leak” a little when you laugh.

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Kids' and Teens' Health Johns Hopkins Medicine

Kids' and Teens' Health. Depression. Debunking Myths of Teen Depression. Correcting and Improving Vision. How to Know If Your Child Needs Glasses. Pediatric. The Growing Child: School-Age (6 to 12 Years) Pediatric. The Growing Child: Adolescent 13 to 18 Years.

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Health Risks of Poor Sleep Johns Hopkins Medicine

Getting a bad night of sleep now and then is annoying, but not a health risk. However, chronic poor sleep may increase the likelihood of developing dementia, heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and even cancers of the breast, colon, ovaries and prostate.

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LGBTQ Health Care: Answers from Expert Paula Neira Johns

Looking for a health care provider is never easy, but for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer/questioning (LGBTQ) individuals, the search is especially challenging. Faced with inadequate — and sometimes hostile — care, many LGBTQ patients are understandably reluctant to share their

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Interns Johns Hopkins Medicine Osler Medical Residency

Career Interests: Global Health, Public Health/Policy Firm: Thayer. Will was born at Johns Hopkins and grew up in Charlotte, NC as one of three triplets. He went to Yale University where he majored in Biology and played rugby. He then obtained an MSc in Global Health at Trinity College Dublin prior to medical school at Hofstra.

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Men's Health Screenings Johns Hopkins Medicine

For example, health experts recommend maintaining a schedule for men’s health screenings. Specific tests and screenings are suggested for men within various age groups, ranging from age 18 to 65 (and above). Many health screenings, such as blood pressure and depression, can be conducted during routine physicals.

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6 Ways to Be Proactive About Your Child's Eye Health

Provide a balanced diet. Nutrients such as zinc, lutein, omega-3 fatty acids, and vitamins A, C and E have been found to be beneficial to eye health. Fruits with vitamins C and E, such as oranges, strawberries and mangos, can help restore tissues and prevent infections. The omega-3 fatty acids found in fish can prevent dry eye and reduce future

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Exercise and the Heart Johns Hopkins Medicine

The National Institute of Health, the American Heart Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine are all good sources for assistance in choosing the right exercise routine. Johns Hopkins has a clinical exercise center which offers medically supervised programs and exercise guidelines based on scientific evidence.

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Rosacea Johns Hopkins Medicine

Rosacea is a common chronic skin condition that usually only affects the face and eyes. Occasionally, the neck, chest, or other areas may be involved. Characterized by redness, pimples, and broken blood vessels, rosacea tends to begin after middle age (between the ages of 30 and 60). It is more common in fair-skinned people and women in menopause.

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How to Properly Wear a Face Mask: Infographic Johns

Follow these guidelines to properly wear your face mask. Wash your hands before and after touching the mask. Touch only the bands or ties when putting on and taking off your mask. Make sure the mask fits to cover your nose, mouth and chin. If you adjust the mask to …

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